Crock Pot Corned Beef – Making it Healthier

Crock pot corned beef is an excellent recipe to use as an example of how you can make a dish more "body friendly." That is, to make recipes healthier so you can maintain a healthy diet plan while consuming foods you like to eat.

This is important if your goal is to maintain a normal weight and your health.

The fact that crock pot corned beef is tasty and easy to prepare make it all the more enticing.

What Is Corned Beef?

Corned beef is beef brisket bathed in salt and spices. It got its name from the large grains of salt originally used for this process known as "corns."

Beef brisket is a very tough cut of meat and boasts a large amount of fat. The salt and fat will have to be greatly decreased before you include crock pot corned beef in your healthy diet plan.

This is easy to do but takes an extra step or two in the cooking process.

Lengthy Cooking Process

Crock pot corned beef requires a lengthy cooking process. Don't plan on making this dish unless you have the time to invest in it.

Usually you can assemble your crock pot dish and put it on "automatic." It cooks without any further input on your part.

However, to remove the fat from your crock pot corned beef you will have to add an additional step to the cooking process. The extra time and effort is worth it to reduce your fat consumption. This will reduce the calories in this dish.

That's a good thing!

The excess salt found in this dish will remain in the juice, which will be discarded after the food is gone. You will get the flavor but will not consume the majority of the salt.

Less Fat And Reduced Salt

Remove the meat from the crock pot after 8 hours of cooking on low and allow it to cool. Once it is cool remove the large layer of fat off the top. This is most easily accomplished by using a long slicing knife to separate the slab of fat from the meat.

Discard the fat. Cover the meat and store in the refrigerator.

Pour the juice from the crock pot into a bowl and refrigerate overnight. The liquefied fat will float on top of the liquid. The cold from the refrigerator will cause the liquefied fat to congeal overnight.

In the morning remove the congealed fat from the liquid by gently lifting it off the surface with a slotted spoon or spatula. Carefully decant the liquid back into the crock pot leaving the spices in the bowl. Discard the spices.

Cooked Vegetables Supply Fiber

In addition to the cabbage this dish is traditionally made with you may opt to add red potatoes, turnips, or rutabagas that have been peeled and cut into edible chunks. Cut the vegetables you want to include and place them into your crock pot.

Pour the defatted liquid over the vegetables. Place the corned beef brisket on top and smear with 3 Tbsp. of yellow mustard.

Cover the crock pot and cook 5 hours on low. The vegetables will be soft when finished. Any raw food enzymes present before cooking will have been destroyed by heat, as will most of the vitamins. The main nutritional benefit of this dish is the fiber found in the vegetables and protein from the meat.

Raw Vegetable Diet Supplies Nutrients

The loss of raw food enzymes and vitamins is why a raw vegetable diet component for most of your meals is a good idea. By consuming raw food diets nutritional food quality is retained.

The simple corned beef meal arose from humble beginnings. There are numerous variations of this basic recipe using different meats and vegetables. Such boiled dinners are easy to make and turn good cheap food into a hearty meal.

With a little planning these inexpensive healthy recipes can be transformed into good health foods fit for a king. To add raw food enzymes lost in cooking back into your diet you can serve a raw vegetable plate before the meal.

Crock pot corned beef may be considered to be a wintertime meal because it is "good comfort food." It is especially popular on St. Patrick's Day.

However, crock pot corned beef can be graciously served anytime. Add a huge salad containing fresh, colorful summertime vegetables and it becomes a feast for any season.

Dale Heil, D.C.

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